Posted by: celticanglican | July 15, 2009

Your Calvinist Factor

72% for me….odd for this high-church Anglican, but some of my ancestors were Calvinists 🙂

http://www.trouw.nl/religie-filosofie/nieuws/article2050113.ece

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Responses

  1. I am often criticized on the internet as being too Reformed. I have even been called an “ultra-Calvinist.” I took the quiz and scored only 58%–so much for being too Reformed, for being a High Calvinist. I already knew that I was moderate in my Reformed views; the quiz confirmed what I already knew. It suggests that people have a lot of stereotypes about Reformed Anglicans. They also seem unaware that a number of views that they equate with Calvinism did not originate with John Calvin but belong a a body of Reformed theology that the sixteenth century Reformers held in common, the English Reformers as well as the Swiss Reformers. The Swiss Reformer Heinrich Bullinger had greater influence upon the English Reformers and the Elizabethan Church than did John Calvin. Unfortunately North American Anglicans do not know a lot about the Reformed heritage of Anglicanism.

    • Hi Robin,
      Thanks for posting and please feel free to share a little more about the Reformed tradition if you like.

    • Interesting, we Methodists, from John Wesley on down, are obviously not Calvinistic. Wesley abhored the concept of predestination and thought it wrong and led people astray.

      See my book:
      J. Robert (Bob) Ewbank’s book “John Wesley, Natural Man, and the ‘Isms’ has been published. The ‘Isms’ are Heathenism, Judaism, Deism, Roman Catholicism, Quakerism, and Mysticism. The questions being answered are: how does each of them differ from John Wesley’s idea of True Christianity, and what are the prospects for those holding these views being saved.

      Written for the layperson as well as the scholar, there is a Study Guide in the back of the book to help individual or group study. The Guide has questions in the front, which are answered later in the Guide.

      Bob has a B.A. from Baker University in Baldwin, Kansas and an M.A. from Garrett-Evangelical. He is currently Lay Leader of St. Mark UMC, in Mobile, AL.

      Bishop Rueben P. Job of the United Methodist Church has written some kind words on the back cover.

      Sam Royappa District Superintendent of the Coulee District in Wisconsin has recommended this book to his clergy and laity.

      A review of the book has also been published in the October 15, 2009 copy of The Laity Link which is the newsletter of the Alabama-West Florida Conference Board of Laity.

      The book is being used by one local Sunday School, divided into 14 sessions.

      To find the book go on the internet to:

      1. http://www.wipfandstock.com (Wipf and Stock) For your information, the book is $23.00 at bookstores, but at the web site it is only $18.40
      2. The book is now available at Cokesbury, Barnes and Noble, Books-a-Million, WJE at Yale (The Jonathan Edwards Center), Kalahari.net, Paddyfield.com,www.deepershopping.com, Booktopia, abdbooksellers.com; Christianbooksbibles.com, IBS.it, Webster.it, Bibleknowledgebookstore.com, Angus & Robertson.com.au, JabezChristianStore.com, Boonbridgebooks.com, Alibris.com, Infibeam, and Amazon.com among others.

  2. I am a central churchman, but lean a little lower as a get older. I scored 81 percent. Maybe because I live in Western Pennsylvania’s Presbyterian Valley?

    Thanks for posting the quiz.

    • Could be Richard 🙂

      You’re most welcome, and thanks for posting.


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