Posted by: celticanglican | December 7, 2015

Yes, We’re Battling a Tough Crowd, But…

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Ecclesiastes 2:7-18 has what I think is one of the best assurances of God’s faithfulness in the Bible. Few people probably knew the reality behind this concept than Ambrose of Milan, a bishop and Doctor of the Church who died in 397.

Ambrose lived during a time when the controversy between Arians and Trinitarians was at its highest. By using his theological prowess, he was able to defend the principles of orthodox Christianity effectively.

Although we live in an era where most of us aren’t going to have to cope with the type of political intrigue that this era of the Church did, Christianity is and never has been an easy ride. God has never promised us that things would be easy, but we would have grace to bear whatever burdens that life throws towards us.

Christians in many areas lack the freedom to worship freely, and in areas with religious freedom, are often caught with finding a balance between respectful dialogue and defending the faith effectively. We fall short of this all too often, yet our ancestors in the faith have helped equip us to deal with these challenges.

It’s interesting that Ambrose’s feast falls during Advent, a time when most of the world is caught up in the better-known celebrations of Christmas and New Year. When you think about it, what better time is there to bring Christ’s message of reconciliation to the rest of the world than during a time of year that makes it hard for many to see the light of Christ?

 

 

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