Posted by: celticanglican | April 19, 2016

Seasoning – Not Just for Food!

John Wesley preaching outside a church. Engraving. Wellcome V0006868

Maybe our evangelism needs to be more like this famous man’s and less like some of today’s “teachers”

Colossians 4:5 – 6 has some of the wisest advice in Scripture, situated within a chapter that many overlook because of its directives that apply to another culture. However, there is some wisdom for this day and age that you should bear in mind when reading.

The Church in its infancy struggled with the role of marginalized groups, such as women, Gentile believers, and slaves. Admidst this, the earliest followers had to figure out how to best reach out to people in a way that united, rather than divided.

Many people today use little, if any, discretion in their dealings with each other. This holds true not only for religious beliefs, but also for politics and other idealogy-based beliefs.

It’s unfortunately easier for people to shout out or shut out ideas they don’t like than appreciate the fact that the other person has their own “story” that has influenced their beliefs. This doesn’t mean we must accept everyone’s beliefs as truth, but that we should season our words with salt in order to approach others.

Think about it, why are you more likely to listen to? One that constantly tells you you’re wrong, evil, headed to eternal separation from God, etc. for disagreeing, or one that respects where you’re coming from and tries to understand?

Preaching the Gospel for Christians is often about having doors opened that would otherwise be closed. We need to strive to make sure the door remains open for us, rather than acting in a way that makes non-believers shut us out.

Remember the old adage about how God gave us two ears but only one mouth. Maybe this is so we can listen more and use our talk more responsibly.

 

Advertisements

Responses

  1. I completely agree with this! Jesus’ preaching was vitally different from most preachers today!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: